Friday, October 23, 2009

3 Learning Tips to Learn Faster and Improve Memory

- By: Leonidas Auerbach

When you take an action you're previously taken... when you repeat a thought you previously had, you're effectively strengthening the synapses in your brain

These synapses create a cause-and-effect relationship between the neurons they linked. So that every time one neuron fires, the other will too. These synapses are like a bridge that connects two neurons so that signals between them may pass.

So what has this got to do with your learning and memory?

Well, these synapses are what's responsible for your them. The more you learn the more synapses you grow and the stronger these synapses are, the better your memory is.

In this article, I will introduce you to three laws of building and strengthening synapses. Master and implement these laws and you'll no doubt see a marked improvement in not just your learning and memory, but also overall brain function.

1. Law of association. When you learn, you learn through associations, building above what you have known to make sense of the unknown.

For example, when I explained the concept of synapses, I use the terms "relationships" and "bridge". You're, of course, familiar with these terms. Thus you use what are already familiar to make sense of the unknown.

Fundamentally, this is how we learn without going through an experience. This is how babies. Contrary to popular belief, we are born with certain skills and knowledge. We know how to cry when we face certain stimulus (such as hunger and discomfort), we know how to move, we know how to recognize faces. These are the basic knowledge that we all have and we build upon as we grow up.

Thus when you learn, it is often far easier to associate what you learn with what you've already known. You may have trouble remembering a phone number, but if you associate that number with a date and age, such as 04-08-2012 78 instead of 0408201278, then it is far easier for you to remember that number.

The reason is because obscure facts are placed only in the short-term memory. Only when intense attention is paid and constant reminder is acquired that it starts to be moved. By associating with current fats, you can almost immediately build off long term memory.

2. Law repetition. Practice makes perfect. This is true for anything you want to learn and remember. The reason is because when you practice or revise, you're strengthening the synapses between the neurons involved in that activity.

I still recall how awkward I was when I began to type on a keyboard. Now I could type without looking at the keys. But if I were to change keyboards, again I would have to look at the keys and learn its distance.

This is the law of repetition at work. However, only 2 hours of uninterrupted practice and/or revision is needed for you to master a skill. In fact, if you spend long hours of practice only to stop later, the skills you've picked up at that time will fade as synapses break down.

If you want to master what you learn, it is more effective if you take a constant approach.

3. Law of attention. Michael Merzenich, one of the world's leading neuro-plasticity scientists observed through brain scans that neural network responsible for learning only grow when attention is paid onto the stimulus.

This is why multitasking is detrimental to learning. When you multitask, you cannot focus - thus you cannot learn. It amazes me how students attempt to study for exams while listening to music and have their chat browser open.

It is a biological impossibility.

At the same time, multitasking at work yields the same result. When you should be able to learn from an experience that you have, multitasking robs you of that opportunity.

Did you know that multitasking lowers IQ by 10 points (more than what smoking pot would) and increases stress (which in turn makes the brain release chemicals that kills brain cells)?

To learn and remember, all you have to do is focus on the stimulus, for a short period of time. 2 - 3 hours a day is normally sufficient.

In this article, I will introduce you to three laws of building and strengthening synapses. Master and implement these laws and you'll no doubt see a marked improvement in not just your learning and memory, but also overall brain function.

If you would to learn more about brain fitness, simply visit Andre Auerbach's website, "Brain Training Made Easy" for more articles on brain exercises, improving memory and learning.
http://www.truehealthproject.com/brain-training

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